Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

The restored mansion has 14 rooms and 6,809 square feet of living space. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

The restored mansion has 14 rooms and 6,809 square feet of living space. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

The restored mansion has 14 rooms and 6,809 square feet of living space. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

The restored mansion has 14 rooms and 6,809 square feet of living space. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Smokehouse and Outbuildings
Somerset Place

In 1839, 172 hams hung in this building for use by the Collins family. Josiah Collins III regularly provided smoked hams to relatives. This surprisingly large smokehouse—an original structure—is distinguished by having three free-standing hearths. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

The restored mansion has 14 rooms and 6,809 square feet of living space. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - Smokehouse and Outbuildings
Somerset Place

In 1839, 172 hams hung in this building for use by the Collins family. Josiah Collins III regularly provided smoked hams to relatives. This surprisingly large smokehouse—an original structure—is distinguished by having three free-standing hearths. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Colony House currently serves as the site's visitor center. A gift shop and exhibits are also housed in this historic structure. Originally, the building was a boarding school and residence for the Collins boys, their tutors, and the plantation's resident ministers (1/1/2001 - Credits: Home website)Somerset Place - The Colony House currently serves as the site's visitor center. A gift shop and exhibits are also housed in this historic structure. Originally, the building was a boarding school and residence for the Collins boys, their tutors, and the plantation's resident ministers (6/29/2002 - Credits: Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - Chapel foundation ruins (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Overseer's House
Somerset Place

Built in 1954 at the site of the original double pen, two-family overseer's house. The building's modern features reflect its use as a park ranger's residence until 1993. A minimum of two overseers and their families lived at Somerset Place during the antebellum period. One was called the "under overseer." The location and orientation of the building provides important clues to an understanding of the overseer's housing in relationship to the enslaved community. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Transportation Canal
Somerset Place

Completed in 1788, this canal served as the primary means of transporting crops, lumber, and people to and from Somerset throughout the life of the plantation. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Kitchen / Laundry
Somerset Place

Located near the main house, this original two-room building, with its central fireplace, was used to launder articles of clothing (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - The Lake Hospital — Foundation Ruins
Somerset Place

 (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Outside hearth (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - Early records indicate butter churns, pails, and tubs were housed in Somerset's dairy — an original structure. Butter, milk, cheese, and other foods requiring a cool storage area may have been kept in the dairy for extended periods of time. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Kitchen Rations building
Somerset Place

Situated next to the kitchen, this building — having both original and reconstructed components — housed molasses, sugar, rum, salt, and other bulk stored staples. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place - Reconstructed Slave Cabin
(also known as "Judy and Lewis' House)
Somerset Place

Completed in 1997, this reconstructed building (16' x 16') represents one of 23 one-room slave houses that were once arrayed along the shore of Lake Phelps. Occupancy ranged from three to 15 people.
 (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - Formal Garden 
Somerset Place

Mary Collins was a passionate gardener and the chief architect of the plantation's formal garden. Three slaves were assigned specifically to this area and the Collins family's personal vegetable garden. (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place (6/28/2002 - Credits: State of NC/Wynn Smith)Somerset Place - The Collins Mansion
Somerset Place

Parlor (1/1/2001)Somerset Place (6/1/2005 - Credits: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/somerset/somerset.htm)Somerset Place (6/1/2005 - Credits: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/somerset/somerset.htm)Somerset Place (6/1/2005 - Credits: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/somerset/somerset.htm)Somerset Place (6/1/2005 - Credits: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/somerset/somerset.htm)Somerset Place (6/1/2005 - Credits: http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/somerset/somerset.htm)